Saturday, April 29, 2017

Square-mesh netting in strips - with loops


One of the other square-mesh patterns included in the Encyclopedia of Needlework by Therese De Dillmont was a strip of netting with loops along the bottom instead of the usual selvage.



Here are my instructions for creating this piece of square-mesh netting.

A Strip of Square-Mesh Netting – Selvage on the Top and Loops on the Bottom – 7 Squares High

Before starting the actual netting:

  1. Fill a netting needle or shuttle with thread or cord. 
  2. Attach it to a foundation loop.  To do this:
    1. Tie a slip knot in the thread or cord coming from the needle or shuttle.  Leaving a tail, at least 2 to 3 inches.  
    2. Slip the foundation-loop cord through the slipknot.  
    3. Tie the foundation-loop cord into a circle thereby creating a foundation loop. 
    4. Tighten the slipknot.
  3. Attach the foundation loop to a tension device.
  4. Choose a mesh stick.


Start the strip of square-mesh netting:

Row 1:  Net 8 more knots into the foundation loop.  (8 loops in the row)
Remove the mesh stick and turn the work so that the next row can be worked from left to right. (This will be done at the end of each row.)
Row 2:  Net 1 knot into each loop, except the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (9 loops in the row)
Row 3:  Net 1 knot in each loop except the last loop, skip the last loop, turn the netting and start the next row. (8 loops in the row)

Repeat rows 2 and 3 until the piece is as long as desired. Lacis or net embroidery can be added onto the squares.

Saturday, April 22, 2017

Square-Mesh Netting - in strips


Several months ago I was almost ready to proof-read and self-publish a book on square-mesh netting. I just needed to finish working with my husband on the patterns for square-mesh scallops. I also wanted to find two more patterns and figure out how to make them. One was a frame of square-mesh netting with an empty space in the middle. The other was square-mesh netting with big and little squares. Eventually I located them in the Encyclopedia of Needlework by Therese De Dillmont.

To my surprise, I also found instructions and photos for how to make strips of square-mesh netting, how to make square mesh netting starting in the center of the square and working to the corners instead of starting at one corner and working to the diagonal corner, and how to put loops on the edges of the netting. These techniques should be included in any book devoted to making square mesh netting. I began making them and found myself expanding the squares into rectangles.

The strip of square-mesh netting caught my eye and I thought it looked easy enough.


Here are my instructions for creating this piece of square-mesh netting.

A Strip of Square-Mesh Netting – Selvage Edges on the Top and Bottom – 7 Squares High

Before starting the actual netting:
  1. Fill a netting needle or shuttle with thread or cord. 
  2. Attach it to a foundation loop.  To do this:
    1. Tie a slip knot in the thread or cord coming from the needle or shuttle.  Leaving a tail, at least 2 to 3 inches.  
    2. Slip the foundation-loop cord through the slipknot.  
    3. Tie the foundation-loop cord into a circle thereby creating a foundation loop. 
    4. Tighten the slipknot.
  3. Attach the foundation loop to a tension device.
  4. Choose a mesh stick.

Start the strip of square-mesh netting:

Row 1:  Net 8 more knots into the foundation loop.  (8 loops in the row)

  • Remove the mesh stick and turn the work so that the next row can be worked from left to right. (This will be done at the end of each row.)

Row 2:  Net 1 knot into each loop, except the last loop, net 2 knots in the last loop. (9 loops in the row)
Row 3:  Net 1 knot in each loop except the last 2 loops, net the last 2 loops together. (8 loops in the row)

Repeat rows 2 and 3 until the piece is as long as desired. Lacis or net embroidery can be added onto the squares.


Saturday, April 15, 2017

Lantern Stitch Rectangular Shawl


This rectangular shawl turned out to be much wider than I expected. The rows went across the long portion of the shawl. I made sure to have plenty of stitches, since I thought the stitch would stretch down. It did not. Instead it stretched across the row.



Here is the shawl as seen from the back.




This is a closeup of the Lantern Decorative Stitch.

Saturday, April 8, 2017

Hula Stitch Net Shawl - fan


This shawl went a bit fuller than I expected. Some day I'll try one without quite so many stitches. The Hula Increase Stitch increases the number of loops while also pulling some stitches close together.



This is the shawl laid out flat.




Here is the front of the shawl.




 Here is the back of the shawl.




This is a close-up of the neck edge and the first three increases sections.




Here is a close-up of the bottom edge. This edge is a variation of the Spider Decorative Stitch.




Saturday, April 1, 2017

Cube Stitch Shawl - oval


This was my first attempt to create an oval shawl.  I used a bulky yarn, much thicker than I ususally use. I began by making a rectangle using the Cube Decorative Stitch. Next, along one of the long sides, I decreased the number of stitches, using a Peaks Decrease Stitch. That is the part that would go around the neck. Finally, I net the Rigging Edge around the entire shawl.

This is what the shawl looks like when it is laid out flat.




This is the shawl as seen from the front. To keep the shawl on, it may be necessary to attach two or three of the loops together with some form of button.





This is the shawl as seen from the back. The rectangle of  Cube Decorative Stitch is in the middle of the back.


This oval shawl does not like to stay on my shoulders as well as the fan-shaped shawls do.



Saturday, March 25, 2017

Cube Stitch Net Shawl


I had been saving some variegated yarn I really liked. I decided to use it and make a shawl with one of my favorite stitches - the Cube Stitch. This shawl was made using several rows of the Icicle Increase Stitch, multiple rows of the Cube Decorative Stitch, and the Increase Rigging Edge with Fringe.

Here is the shawl laid out flat. The cube stitch creates several optical illusions, cubes and circles to name a couple. 




Here is the front of the shawl.





Here is the back of the shawl.













Saturday, March 18, 2017

Fireworks (small)


This is one of the doilies my grandmother Esther Peterson Bott Freeman designed. She made it using two colors. This is what it looked like without the color. I think I like it better with the color on the outer rows of the doily.



If you want to know more about this doily, its size, and which stitches were used, click here.